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ASK has made their galleries accessible to the public online, 24/7! This exhibit will also be displayed in our galleries at 97 Broadway in Kingston from May 1-30, 2021.

Click on an image below to begin the slideshow. To hear the stories behind the portraits, visit the multimedia page. All portraits are available in 16×16 or 18×18 ($500, matted to 22×24, unframed, edition of 5) or 12×12 ($350, unmatted, unframed, edition of 10). If you would like to purchase a work, scroll down to the bottom of the page or email us at ask@askforarts.org

This month’s Spotlight exhibition is I/WE STILL COUNT (Voices from Nursing Homes, Their Portraits and Stories)

After the tragic loss of so many of our elders and disabled in nursing homes due to COVID-19, we saw a need to preserve and share their stories with a wide audience. These are people who have lived remarkable lives with amazing experiences – we want to share their journeys with this exhibit.

This series has been in the making for 20 years. During this time, I found inspiration in the courage and persistence of these residents to overcome their disabilities and “live” despite their circumstances. I was constantly affected by the residents’ dignity and everyday struggles to enjoy what they can. A series of circumstances in my life (widowhood and aging) and also the pandemic of Covid-19 has inspired me to reexamine what this project truly means in this current era.  I found a new inspiration that opened my eyes and mind to bathe in the beauty of the extraordinary qualities found in our ordinary lives.

When I began this project in 1995, I was emotionally moved by the courage of these residents to overcome their disabilities with dignity and embrace every moment of life. Even their most ordinary activities would bring meaning and fulfillment to them. It is of utmost importance that we celebrate these survivors. This exhibition includes portraits and stories from our conversations.

The sick, elderly and the disabled are vital and integral components of our society and culture that should be showcased, not overlooked. These residents not only show us where we as people have been, but also open the window into our future because they are us. Not only for their sake, but also for ours we must provide the attention and care they deserve.

These photographed sitters from 20 years ago did not perish from Covid-19, however, they are icons and represent those who are most vulnerable today. Their message emanates from these portraits: “I/We Still Count (Voices from Nursing Homes, Their Portraits and Stories).”

I want to thank the Arts Society of Kingston for giving me the opportunity to share this very special and timely project with the public.

Margery Schab